Today, we have another simple tip on IBEW Hour Power. Today, we present a couple of different solutions to the battery problem, and hopefully they help you while you are doing your job in the field. This common sense tip might seem easy or obvious, but you’d be surprised that a little bit of planning on a union construction site could go a long way! Check out this newest in our series of job tips – let us know what you think and if you have a tip of your own, send it in to us.

To download this video, click here.

Job Tips are sponsored by Klein Tools

Since 1857 Klein Tools has been the leader in the design, development, production and marketing of quality products and services that meet the needs of trade professionals and other skilled craftsmen and women who use tools to do their jobs. Discover what the pros know at www.kleintools.com.

The IBEW Hour Power Job Tips are time saving tips and tricks for the job-site. Tune into our Job Tips channel for more tips like this one.

 

Transcript – Job Tip: Label your Batteries

Hi, I’m Robert Waschneck, Local Union 124 in Kansas City. A common problem you might run into on the job site is keeping track of all the different batteries, of which ones are charged and which are depleted.

So, a simple solution to that might be to come up with a simple numbering system, some sticky tags you can put numbers on or use the phase tape you have available on the job site and do a different color code on the different batteries. Now that might help you keep track of what’s been charged or depleted.

A secondary solution might be if you have a bad cell with a bad charge or bad battery, now you’ve got a number and you know to take that one out of service. I hope this tip helps you on your job site save you some time and aggravation.

(2230 views)

Matthew Walton

Matthew Walton is the host of IBEW Hour Power and has been with the program since its beginnings in 2007. As an IBEW Hour Power host and producer, Matthew travels across the United States and Canada visiting job sites, training centers, and union halls to tell the stories of the IBEW brothers and sisters that work so hard every day.

View all posts